Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany

  General Remarks
The Germanisches Nationalmuseum was founded in 1852 by a number of (partially well-known) scientists researching historical stuff. The somewhat puzzling name was chosen to promote the idea of a unified "Germany". Please recall (if you can) that in 1852 there was no Germany (or Deutschland) but only a large number of more or less independent kingdoms (like Bavaria), duchesses, free cities and God knows what else in the area defined by a common language.
The goal was to assemble a "well-ordered compendium of all available source material for German history, literature and art". That was done; the museum now houses a collection of 1.2 million objects relating to Germanic culture and art, from prehistoric times to the present day. The Germanisches Nationalmuseum is actually Germany's largest museum of cultural history.
I only spend a few hours there and thus will restrict myself to a few highlights. The first one is that the museum has not (yet) succumbed to the dreaded "keep-things-in-the-dark disease" like for example the Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte, Berlin.
Of course, you find pieces from local top artists like paintings from Dürer ( a Nürnberger) or the first pocket watch produced by the Nürnberger Peter Henlein. There are many Cranachs (also from the general region), some of them with rather modern topics:
 
Sugar daddy; Cranach, Nuernberg
Sugardaddy and mistress
Part of a painting from Lucas Cranach (the elder) from around 1530. It is entitled "Das ungleiche Paar" (the unequal couple)
Source: Photographed 2015 in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
   
Other paintings relate to the topics here. Did you know that Charlemagne's sword actually once broke in a critical moment? Couldn't have been his trusty Joyeuse; I would think. Here is a picture of this event:
     
   
Charlemagne rescued by angel
Charlemagne with broken sword and his rescue angel. C. must have had a great insurance contract.
Part of a painting from Albrecht Altdorfer (around 1518) entitled "Victory of Charlemagne over the Avars near Regensburg".
Large picture
Source: Photographed 2015 in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
     
There are innumerable Madonnas (a whole Gothic church is actually part of the museum!) ....
     
Madonna; Germanisches Nationalmuseum Nuernberg
Madonna
The artist was Adam Kraft, one of the foremost sculptors in the second half of the 16th century.
Source: Photographed 2015 in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
     
... and old stained glass windows. Several relate to swords; here is shown what one can do with a sword:
     
   
Another head count?
(Look up the stories around St. Erasmus and Felicitas to find out)
Source: Photographed 2015 in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
     
  Metal Objects
There is no shortage of metal objects in the museum. Here are three rather spectacular ones:
     
Golden head dress of a bronze age sun priest.
A similar one is in the Neues Mueum, Berlin
Gold / garnet eagle from Theodorics court; around 500 AD.
Roman parade helmet, 2 century AD
Source: Photographed 2015 in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
     
As far as swords are concerned, the museum displays a number of bronze swords (but not as many as, for example, the Schleswig museum). Here is a taste treat:
 
Bromze swords; Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
Top: Middle and late bronze age swords.
Bottom: Hallstatt swords (including an iron one)
Source: Photographed 2015 in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
   
There is a large special exhibit of medieval weapons, including swords, armor and much else:
     
   
Armor; swords, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
A small part of the medieval weapons exhibit
Source: Photographed 2015 in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
     
There is also an "VLBERHT" sword. It is prominently displayed, together with a friend. It is covered in more detail here.
     
Ulfberht sword, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
Ulfberht sword and friend
Source: Photographed 2015 in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nürnberg, Germany
     
So make sure to visit Nürnberg! Beside the fabulous Germanisches Nationalmuseum - that you must visit - you will also find plenty of other good things like especially tasty beer and famous sausages known as "Nürnberger".
     

With frame With frame as PDF

go to Critical Museum Guide

go to Critical Museum Guide: Landesmuseum Schleswig-Holstein in Schleswig, Germany

go to Critical Museum Guide: "The Vikings" Special Exhibition from Oct. 2014 - Jan. 2015 in the Martin-Gropius-Bau

go to Critical Museum Guide: Neues Museum in Berlin, Germany

go to The Frankish Empire And Its Swords

go to Large Pictures chapter 11.4

go to Sword Names

go to Old Sagas, Heroes and Swords

go to Sword Places

go to Large Pictures II

go to Large Pictures III

go to Large Pictures III

© H. Föll (Iron, Steel and Swords script)